Impact of cerebral radiofrequency exposures on oxidative stress and corticosterone in a rat model of Alzheimer's disease - Ineris - Institut national de l'environnement industriel et des risques Access content directly
Conference Papers Year : 2019

Impact of cerebral radiofrequency exposures on oxidative stress and corticosterone in a rat model of Alzheimer's disease

Abstract

Alzheimer´s diseases (AD) is the most common type of neurodegenerative disease leading to dementia. The cause of AD remains unknown, however several studies suggested that mobile phone radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) exposures interacted with AD memory deficits in rodent models. Here we aimed to test the hypothesis that RF-EMF exposure may modify memory through corticosterone and oxidative stress in a rat model of AD. Long-Evans rats were healthy controls or AD models. AD rats received continuous intracerebroventricular infusion with ferrous sulphate, beta amyloid (βA) 1-42 peptide and buthionine-sufloximine (Lecanu, 2006). RF-EMF exposures were performed to the head for 1 month (5 days/week, 15 or 45 min/day in restraint) to mimic cell phone use. To look for hazard threshold, repeated exposures were set to reach high brain averaged specific absorption rates (BASAR): 1,5 W/Kg (15 min), 6 W/Kg (15 min) or 6 W/Kg (45 min). The sham group exposure was 0 W/kg (45 min). Endpoints were spatial memory in the radial maze, plasmatic corticosterone, heme oxygenase 1 (HO1) and neurofibrillary tangles. Results indicated that AD rats had increased thioflavine and HO1 staining, reduced memory performances and similar corticosterone level compared to healthy rats. In AD rats, reduced corticosterone and increased hippocampal HO1 staining were observed after the 6 W/kg 45 min exposure. There was no RF-EMF effect on memory and cortical HO1. In healthy rats, increased cortical HO1 staining was observed after the 6 W/kg 45 min exposure. There was no RF-EMF effect on memory, hippocampal HO1 staining or corticosterone. According to our data, neither AD nor healthy rats showed modified memory after RF-EMF exposures. Unlike healthy rats, AD rats showed higher hippocampal oxidative stress and reduced corticosterone after our highest BASAR exposures. This data may support the hypothesis of a specific fragility related to neurodegenerative disease towards RF-EMF exposures. Further studies should be performed to replicate this data.

Domains

Toxicology
No file

Dates and versions

ineris-03229559 , version 1 (19-05-2021)

Identifiers

  • HAL Id : ineris-03229559 , version 1

Cite

Anne-Sophie Villegier, Marc Bouji. Impact of cerebral radiofrequency exposures on oxidative stress and corticosterone in a rat model of Alzheimer's disease. International meeting NeuroFrance 2019, May 2019, Marseille, France. ⟨ineris-03229559⟩
24 View
0 Download

Share

Gmail Facebook X LinkedIn More